Athens Travel Guide

Parthenon

What to Do

Photo credit: http://www.layoverguide.com/

Photo credit: http://www.layoverguide.com/

One of the pleasures of visiting Athens is being able to do a few things that are unique to the city. So while you’re there, make sure to never miss out on any of these activities.

1) Explore the Small Passages

Explore the picturesque streets of Athens. Strolling around Monastiraki neighborhood is a great way to find nice little shops, explore flea markets, and pick up authentic handmade souvenirs. The many streets surrounding this area are full of hidden gems!

2) Visit the Plaka

Walk right through the heart of Athens and enjoy Greek specialties. Wander the shops and buy Greek crafts. The Plaka is comfortably close to the Acropolis and other historical sites. The area is lined with cozy cafes where you can get an outdoor seat and observe Athens and the people walking by.

3) Take a Cable Car or Hike up all the Way to Mount Lycabettus

If you love hiking and are looking for something slightly different and entertaining, you can walk or take a cable car to the top. The experience of observing Athens from higher elevation is magical and unforgettable. At the top you will find a church. Eat at the popular café on top and enjoy the deep scent of the forest.

4) Take a Plunge at the Hammam Baths

Relax and rejuvenate at the Hammam baths after you have been up and about Athens all day.  This establishment is popular among tourists and locals and makes for a magnificent spa experience. The 2-hour long bath includes a full body scrub and sauna. Extend your sauna experience as long as you want since you can sit there until you decide to leave. Have a warm cup of tea before leaving.

Address: Melidoni 1, Athens, Greece

Top Attractions

Athens has some of the world’s most beautiful and culturally significant attractions. Take a journey back to ancient time with Athens’ top attractions. We have listed them as follows:

1) The Acropolis

The Acropolis is the heart and the most historic part of Athens. It represents the best of Greece, whether we are talking about the ancient or the present Greek civilization. The ancient ruins present a glorious and impressive past made more tangible by enormous marble pillars. The admission cost to this important edifice is around US$15.

Address: Dionysiou Areopagitou Street, Athens

2) Benaki Museum

The entire museum is replete with pieces representative of Greek history. It houses a constantly evolving gallery that makes a lasting impression to those who visit it. If you are trying to save or are traveling on a tighter budget, try visiting on Thursdays when admission is free. The museum’s shop is full of many small souvenirs and goods that are so attractive it is hard not to pick something up. Byzantine pieces are a major highlight of the Benaki Museum. One useful insider tip is to start on the top floors which house the most interesting items.

Address: 1 Koumbari St & Vas. Sofias Av., Athens

Parthenon

Photo Credit: http://www.nascotours.com/athens-summer-2012-p417.html

Photo Credit: http://www.nascotours.com/athens-summer-2012-p417.html

These impressive remains of the rich history of the Greek empire, are a must see for all tourists. The Parthenon is one of Athens most known landmarks and is recognized for its imposing white columns. There is no way you can miss the Eiffel tower of Greece. Before you leave, go by the snack bar and have cold glass of lemonade.

Address: Acropolis, Top of Dionyssiou Areopagitou, Athens

4) The Acropolis Museum

Located in the Acropolis, this modern museum is full of ancient statues and Greek artifacts. Watch the video retelling Athens history and the reconstructed photographs, a showcase of modernity and technology cooperating to preserve the past.  The information you learn here will enrich your visit to any other monuments and attractions. The design, quality, and unique pieces make this museum one of the best in the world.

5) National Archaeological Museum

This museum features arts and artifacts of the ancient tribes who lived in the area. The museum is huge and varied with unique pieces all throughout. Sculptures, vases and bronze and gold pieces are just a few of what you will find in the museum. Many surviving Mycenaean art pieces will grab the attention of anyone interested in ancient history or those who wish to learn about Athens for the first time. Expect to pay about US$9 to explore this magnificent building.

Address: Patission 44, Athens

6) Temple of the Olympian Zeus

This majestic temple dedicated to Zeus is the largest in Greece. This was built from 515 BC until 131 AD. There are two mammoth statues inside – one for the god and the other for the ruler (Emperor Hadrian).

7) Agora

Agora is Athens’ ancient market place. It was center to the city’s public activities since the 6th century BC. It is significant to the history of Athens. Athenians gathered here to listen to Socrates. It was here where St. Paul preached. Enjoy the cool and grassy surroundings of the Agora and look back to its grandeur thousands of years ago.

8) Roman Forum & Tower of the Winds

The Agora didn’t stay very long in its original location. After 5 centuries, the market place was transferred to the smaller Roman Forum. Though smaller in size, it was grander for commercial and administrative functions and served that way until the 19th century. The Tower of Winds is one of its unique features.

9) Filopappos Hill

The Filopappos Hill is a series of canopied inclines with sheltered pathways that lead to century-old monuments. This is a favorite place for the Athenians. Locals cheer on hundreds of kites traditionally flown here during the Lent season.

10) Byzantine Museum

More than 15,000 treasures and relics from 476AD to 1453AD are housed in the Byzantine Museum. This is the legacy of the affluent and powerful Orthodox Church which accumulated this vast collection under the Byzantine Empire.


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Marv Perez

Escape Hunter - January 22, 2014

Athens has some of the worst slums I’ve seen in the entire EU. Quite shocking to see even in downtown Athens.
That was years ago, before the crisis. I reckon it must be a lot worse today.

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